DIY Friday: Eating to Address Pain

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*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

8716387730_df2733cc47_zAs you may have noticed, we’re talking an awful lot lately about how what you eat affects chronic pain (and mobility and performance, and, well, everything). First we heard a dramatic story of healing from decades of severe pain via food from Curt Chaffee, and then I interviewed Dr. Aimée Shunney, Curt’s naturopathic doctor, on how food affects pain, how to do an elimination challenge, and much more.

That said, I figured it was good timing for a DIY Friday that pointed out some of my favorite resources for eating cleanly and sorting out how your diet is affecting you.

Before I dive in, I just want to say that food is a pretty hotly debated topic among many. People get fiercely attached to what works for them and what team they have decided to be on. In my experience, different things work for different people (though I think we can all agree that sugar and processed food are not meant to be consumed by humans), and so this post is from the perspective that your time is best spent on experimenting and seeing how your own body responds. So whether you are vegan or Paleo, here are some places to learn better how to eat clean, and to discover what works best for your own biology:

  • As I mentioned above, I interviewed Dr. Aimée Shunney earlier this week. If you watch/listen to minutes 17:48 to 25:17 of that interview you will hear her detail how you can do an elimination diet on your own at home. And if you want more support, including coaching, a yummy chef designed menu, grocery lists, and more, that’s what Aimée and her co-creator Jennifer Brewer made Cleanse Organic for! This program will take you through an elimination challenge diet and an anti-inflammatory cleanse. 
  • For those of you who are inclined to skew vegan, Rich Roll’s book Finding Ultra is about as inspiring at it gets. It’s a fantastic read and also a great example of how vegan doesn’t mean “soy bacon” or other processed foods. In fact, he prefers to call it a plant power diet, since it is heavy on the plants, light on the grains, and soy and gluten free. 
  • If you’re in the plant-strong category and are looking for more support than just reading Rich Roll’s inspiring story, I recommend my colleague Dinneen Viggiano over at Phytolistic. Dinneen provides holistic lifestyle and nutrition coaching without too much dogma. She specializes in holistic inflammation management (i.e. the exact stuff that makes pain improve) and developing protocols for healthy families.  (P.S. I do realize that most Paleo/Primal folks eat more veggies than most vegetarians, so when I write “plant-strong” in this case I mean more aligned with a vegan/vegetarian plant based diet)
  • I personally skew Paleo/Primal in my eating (I am more Primal as I eat dairy, but hey my people are a long line of herders going way back, so that may not work for you. Paleo is no dairy.) , which means of course that Mark Sisson is one of my heroes. You can find loads of free resources on his widely read blog Mark’s Daily Apple, and his book Primal Blueprint is required reading if you want to investigate the effect of the standard American diet, learn how to eat like your great-great-great-great (times a million) grandparents did, and also get educated about a whole lot of other important things we’re losing like moving functionally, getting sun, playing, and more. 
  • Since I’m a primal girl, it means I’m also madly in love with Gary Taubes‘s work. If you’re a fan of reading research heavy insights, you just can’t do any better than grabbing a copy of Good Calories, Bad Calories. To say it’s an eye opener doesn’t do it service.  If you want the same information without having to wade through a lot of data, grab his book Why We Get Fat: And What to Do About It.
  • And no talk about food would be complete without pointing you to the Weston A. Price Foundation  which supports traditional foods as a result of Dr. Price’s fascinating research into the health of people in traditional cultures. If you want an easily readable and, pun intended, digestible book form of what a Weston Price diet looks like in practice, Real Food by Nina Planck is excellent.

Happy eating!

photo by Graduated Learning

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3 Responses to “DIY Friday: Eating to Address Pain”

  1. downfromtheledge September 28, 2013 at 2:25 pm #

    Thank you so much for these resources…there is so much out there that it’s overwhelming trying to figure out where to start! I so appreciate this entire series/focus…it’s been a gift to happen upon your blog a couple months ago.

    • Brooke September 30, 2013 at 2:21 pm #

      I’m so glad to hear it.

  2. Justin Archer December 4, 2013 at 8:43 pm #

    Since you’re Primal/Paleo (I am too), what’s you’re take on Dave Asprey’s Bulletproof Diet? From what I gather and have tried myself it’s kind of like a Paleo 2.0 diet…if that makes sense. I’d be interested to hear your opinion though. BTW, interestingly enough, the only coffee I’ve liked the taste and effects of is Bulletproof Coffee.

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