Gray Cook

DIY Friday: Move

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*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

5837875221_78fdb12266_bAn alternate title for this post was DIY Friday: Everything. Yep, we're going big picture this week and looking at our most important issue, by which I mean this one of the most crucial DIY Fridays ever, as it is the place from which most problems stem; movement. Or our lack of it. I know what you're thinking: "She's not talking about me. I work out 5 days a week." Actually, I am talking exactly to you! So here's the deal, we live in a culture where we believe that exercise and movement are synonymous. Nope. Totally not the case, particularly if your main form of exercise involves gym machines, which are, as far as I'm concerned, a plague upon our people. Don't you love how I over-dramatize things with blanket statements like that?! Me too.

Anyway, since my Rolfing® practice is filled with people who are dealing with fascial and musculoskeletal issues like chronic pain or injuries, I am frequently telling people how and why to avoid gym machines. So I figured we should just go ahead and dive into that topic here. In particular, I have no love for the elliptical machine which has been marketed as the "safe" choice, and yet creates (in my opinion) the most problems for people, particularly those with low back pain. So I wrote this article a while back when this blog hadn't yet been born and my writing of stuff was happening on my private practice website:

Low Back Pain Beware: The Machine to Avoid at the Gym.

And then Katy Bowman wrote these two stellar posts recently which really get at the heart of the matter in a way that makes my girl crush on her only blossom more. Read them, they are wise, wise, wise posts for discerning the difference between "exercise" and "movement" and understanding just what's so lousy about gym machines, and what we miss when we consider exercise the same thing as movement:

First up, Junk Food Walking, and next up:

A Wee Problem with Crossfit. (Which actually starts out addressing the peeing while exercising issue that many women have, but heads away from a pelvic floor conversation to address the root cause, which is what happens when we 1) live in a movement drought and then 2) load our atrophied bodies with "fitness" or "exercise". )

Lastly, I am also falling more and more in love with MovNat® these days, which is a great system that is taking real deal, do-what-your-ancestors-did-movement and making it accessible. If you want to experience some smart movement, find some MovNat near you. Or check out this DVD set (or you can get the downloadable version) where MovNat (Erwan Le Corre) and Functional Movement Systems™ (Gray Cook) join forces. I don't own it yet, but boy howdy, I'm am excited enough to get my hands on it, and have enough faith in both of these guys work, that I'm pre-plugging it here.

That's it! That's all for this week's DIY! I know it's a broader lens than we generally look through on Fridays here at The FFF, but it is profound stuff, and so read the articles, ponder what your ancestors were doing with their bodies back in the day, and know that moving, truly moving, can resolve and prevent a whole lotta problems for a whole lotta people.

Photo by Tigre Sauvage

DIY Friday: Lengthen those itty bitty hamstrings!

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5483358664_22080e5e98_bI have been a card carrying member of the short hamstrings club my whole life. As a result of a birth injury I had, among other things, profoundly limited range of motion in my posterior chain (think back body/postural musculature). So while every other little girl in ballet class was effortlessly falling into a full split, I was busy trying desperately to touch my toes, which at that time resulted in merely touching my knees. Yep you guessed it, ballet classes didn't last long for me (and ended in tears...). I honestly had recurring dreams as a child about doing an exquisite forward fold and being able to press my nose to my knees.

While I still struggle to some extent with mobility restrictions in my posterior chain (the nose to knees dream has yet to be realized for example) I have come a long, long way from the days of feeling like the gimpy girl in ballet class. I still smile every time my hands touch the floor in a forward fold, and I doubt that will ever go away! So for those of you who are looking at the floor with yearning as your fingertips dangle far above the floor, this DIY Friday is for you.

The first 3 videos are re-posts from my private practice blog, Soma Happy, which was the inspiration for FFF (it became FFF because I wanted it to be more than just my voice). So you can watch my three favorite insta-hamstring lengtheners in action! They are all taken from Yoga Tune Up®, which I teach, and if you want to get the magical therapy balls for yourself, you can find them here. And once you get past all of my videos, there is a link to a super useful post from Gray Cook which offers another perspective.

First up, how to use the therapy balls to safely roll out the hamstrings directly without agitating the sciatic nerve:

Secondly, this one is a sneaky little side door entrance to longer hamstrings! You'll find that by simply rolling out your feet, that your entire posterior chain is lengthened courtesy of the magic of fascia (connective tissue). Test it out for yourself by doing an initial forward fold/toe touch, then rolling out one foot, and doing another toe touch before moving on to the other side. Are your hamstrings much longer on the side that got the foot rolling? Boy howdy they are!

Lastly, this is a stretch called Asymmetrical Forward Fold which will really get you and your toes closer to one another. Try the same test/retest as in the last video by doing before and after forward folds, checking the difference between sides when you have only worked one leg.

Ok that's just about enough of me. All of my approaches here are myo-fascial release oriented. For another perspective from a great mind in functional movement, this is an excellent article from Gray Cook, one of the co-founders of Functional Movement Systems, which addresses the neural factors at play, and the why behind short hamstrings. Hint: many of us are using them as stabilizers, so if you want to lengthen them, you had also better pay close attention to upping the ante on stability and motor control as well. Bonus! It also has phenomenal instruction on deadlifting (with video) if you stick around to the end. Check it out here: What's In a Toe Touch? 

 

Photo by kevinalle