Restorative Exercise

DIY Friday: Too Tight and Too Loose Ankles

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*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

People are frequently plagued by seemingly disparate, but often intertwined, problems with their ankles. More specifically the curse of the too tight ankle, and the curse of the too loose ankle.

Too tight ankles are a pain in the butt for things like doing squats, and for walking and running in ways that won't agitate your spine (because you need ankle mobility for normal biomechanical movement of the spine- true story!).

Too loose ankles are known by their partner in crime: the constantly repeating ankle sprain and the nagging sense that you can't trust bearing weight to the all important weight bearing ankle.

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So whether you're a tight-ankled person or a chronic sprainer- or a combo platter of both as your ankle tries to stabilize and find a happy home base- here are some excellent resources for your self care needs:

  • Did that leave you hungry for more!? Did you totally fall in love with that Wheelies in the Park move!? I thought so. Here Katy talks shop re: ankles with more precision, and also includes the inspiration for the wheelies move, a video by the brilliant Jill Miller. (Seriously the Wheelies in the Park is one of my new favorite things and has my neighbors worried, yet again, about my sanity as I play with them in my yard).
  • Lastly, Jill makes another ankle-relevant cameo, but this time with Kelly Starrett on MobilityWOD. He talks about the important piece of the fibular head being able to "get out of the way" so the ankle can move. I see this particular stuck-ness a lot in my practice. And Jill, the chocolate to his peanut butter, comes to the rescue with a therapy ball move to mobilize that. Do not do this with anything harder than a therapy ball. Please and thank you.

Go forth and have happy ankles.

photo by Generation X-Ray 

DIY Friday: Keeping Your Body Complaint Free At Work

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*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

Most of us spend a hearty portion of our lives at work, which these days means we spend a large amount of time sitting (or standing) at computers, using our smartphones, and being pretty limited in the ranges of movement we're utilizing. We all know inactivity is a problem, but that's not what I'm talking about in today's post. Sadly, we've gotten so focused on the "inactivity problem", that we're just viewing it as a, "Is my heart rate getting up at some point this week?" question. I'm all for getting your cardiovascular health in order, but let's take a look instead at getting your myofascial and alignment health in order.

In English, what I'm asking is how do we deal with the amount of pain- primarily low back, neck, and shoulder pain- that our work days leave us with? Because heading to the gym after work will get your heart rate up, but it's doing nothing to address the pain,  the tissue dehydration and glueing, and the joint thinning that is happening by being static in poorly aligned positions all day long.

Funny businessmanLet's start with the sitting. In case you missed the memo, sitting is the new smoking. New research shows that it significantly increases mortality from all causes. In fact, every hour spent sitting shortens life span more significantly that every cigarette smoked. True story.

Ok, fine. Sitting = bad. Got it. I'll stand then. I'm off to buy a standing desk right now, so it's all good!

Prediction: Standing all day instead of sitting all day isn't going to solve our chronic pain problems. It will just give us a slight variation on the current problems. (Though is likely to be more beneficial for staving off cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancers, so that is a total bonus)

Here's the deal- doing any one thing all day long is not going to be good for you. And doing any one thing poorly all day long is definitely not going to be good for you. I'll get to each point one at a time:

First, doing anything all day long is not what we're built for. We are designed for constantly varied movement, so it is the sheer limitation of picking one thing and doing it for an entire day- in this case sitting or standing, looking at a screen, with your arms bent at the elbow out in front of you and your fingers working away furiously on a keyboard of some kind- that is causing us so much trouble.

To address our need for constantly varied movement:

  • This September I transitioned into a work schedule that is now about 50% Rolfing® and Tune Up Fitness®, and 50% writing. So half of the time I physically work with bodies to help them to heal themselves, and half the time I write about how bodies can heal themselves. As you may have guessed, that latter half requires a big increase in the amount of screen time in my life. Since the irony of writing about bodies feeling better while glued to a computer was too rich, I decided I needed a new system. I've been tinkering with different options, but at the moment I'm very happy with dividing my time in a routine of 40 minutes/10 minutes of writing to moving.

This is my particular adaptation of the Pomodoro Technique. I set a timer on my phone for 40 minutes, and during that time I single task on whatever project I'm working on. Single tasking as in no social media and no other distractions. I am just working on what I have as my top priority in that moment. So, for example, right now my timer is ticking away while I write this post. I will only write this post during this time. When the timer goes off, I will switch it to a 10 minute interval, during which I will move in whatever form feels good. I work from home so I will often be doing Yoga Tune Up corrective exercise or therapy ball self-massage here in my office. But I've also been known to sprint down to my neighborhood beach (a block away, lucky me, I know), sprint around my house, and generally jump around, climb over things, and make a nuisance of myself in the neighborhood. Fortunately many of my neighbors know what I do for work. Others have decided I'm crazy. It's all good.

But you don't work from home and your boss already thinks you're crazy? I admit that being in a conventional work environment makes this more challenging because not only do you need to move, but you also need to take on your work culture's phobia of movement. I understand it can be a tall order depending on where you work, but I think it's a really valuable thing to take on for the sake of your own health and the sake of everyone's health around you. I recommend slowly getting them used to the idea (no hurdling over the cubicle dividers!), with simple stretching at the wall, or briskly walking to the break room and back, or holding walking meetings (fab 3 minute TED talk on that here). If you are going to be trying to shift your workplace's movement phobia please email me. I would love to help out and follow along as best I can.

  • Even without 10 minute movement breaks (which you should totally take btw), you should at least switch up your positioning so that you're not sitting in one configuration all day. Here is Katy Bowman's How Much Do I Sit  quiz which you are likely to find very enlightening. It also has a list of options for increasing your movement throughout the day. 
  • I also adore Katy's Think Outside the Chair poster, with the myriad options for how one can sit when a chair is removed from the equation, but unfortunately after much searching I can no longer find it except for in this expired Facebook post about it. Please tell us you'll bring back the poster Katy!? Pleeeeeeaaaaase!?

Next up, whether we choose to sit or we choose to stand, or some combination of those, we are, for the most part, doing it poorly. When we sit we typically sit on our sacrums, this creates a C-curved spine, which we then remedy by working like hell in our spinal muscles to pull ourselves upright, and I think you've already discovered that that lasts approximately 2 minutes before you collapse back into a slump from muscle fatigue. With standing, we are generally standing with our pelvises out in front of us (past our ankles) which tweaks our low back, not to mention everything else, just the same.

To address our poor alignment (and the havoc is wreaks) in sitting and standing: 

  • Esther Gokhale and her Gokhale Method are recent discoveries of mine, but thus far I'm into it. Here is a great article on her in the New York Times where they call her The Posture Guru of Silicon Valley. And if you're wanting to see her method in action, and how it can help you to sit better at work, this is a video of her demonstrating it at the Ancestral Health Symposium.  

Now go move in varied ways and be happy at work!

DIY Friday: Plantar Fasciitis

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*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

A recent chat with the Facebook tribe started to go down the plantar fasciitis rabbit hole, so here I am dedicating a DIY Friday to it! I also have an interview coming up next week with Jae Gruenke, founder of Balanced Runner, and since so many runners struggle with plantar fasciitis it seemed like a theme was emerging.

First, what the heck is plantar fasciitis? The short version is that the plantar fascia (fascial sheet on the bottom of your foot) begins to pull away from it's attachement on the calcaneus (heel bone) and you wind up with some pretty gnarly burning heel and foot pain. In the book Born to Run* author Christopher MacDougall describes it as the runner's version of a vampire bite, because, as runner legend has it, once you're "bitten" with plantar fasciitis many feel you are never the same again. Well breathe deep because I'm here to tell you that plantar fasciitis is one of those things that I actually have in the "easy" category in my brain simply because I see it resolve so often and so readily. Which isn't to say it doesn't take some doing, but here's how:

  • Erik Dalton is a brilliant manual therapist and teacher, and this video is the clearest description I have found of what is actually going on in plantar fasciitis. The article that precedes the video also does a fanstasic job of explaining how it's not just your foot. It's never just one thing. Never, ever. But it's always helpful to be educated on the more global view of any condition, which is what this article handily does! If you are a manual therapist, there is also great content here on how you can treat it in your clients. If you are not a manual therapist, please don't go grabbing your friend's leg and shoving and shaking stuff around! It actually takes a good bit of learning in order to effectively contact fascia and to know how to appropriately work joints like he does in the video, so just mashing on your buddies is likely to cause more harm than good. The article is here, and the video is at the end of it.

 

  • Speaking of taking a global view, as Dalton mentions in his article, "Plantar fasciitis often results from lack of individuality of motion in the calf muscles due to adhesions." That is very true, and taking it a bit further, it is an issue with the whole posterior chain of fascia. Otherwise known as the "superficial back line" as defined by Tom Myers Anatomy Trains work. Here is a great image of that line. So, if you want to resolve your plantar fasciitis, give due attention to everything here along the chain as well.

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  • Oh look! Here's recently interviewed Sue Hitzmann of the MELT Method preaching it like she teaches it, and is also talking about plantar fasciitis as a global issue:

  • Oh wait! What do we have here!? It's Katy Bowman of Restorative Exercise talking about plantar fasciitis as a global issue (in particular those persnickity hamstrings with some data that talks about why). Hmmm, maybe it's not just about the foot...

Ok, ok, taking all this good input about how it's not just your foot and moving forward with a healing plan for yourself here's what I actually like, a lot, for treating plantar fasciitis:

Smart fascial manual therapy from either a practitioner, or you can MELT at home.

Softness! Learning how to soften your foot is a game of coaxing it to let go, not of yanking it around. I like hamstring stretches that have a fully dorsiflexed ankle (bring toes toward shin) so that you're not missing tight bits in your calves. This would look like lying on your back with a strap around the ball of your foot, and flexing at your hip to bring the foot closer to the ceiling. Though stop when you hit your own end range with the flexed ankle (rather than pointing the toe to get farther). You can also stretch standing on a slant board like this one, again, I like a soft surface to a slant board, and it is also very helpful to think about really letting all the musculature of your foot soften into is as you stretch. Think of your plantar fascia as warm, gooey silly putty that is just oozing onto the slant board. Do not hyperextend at the knee or shove your pelvis forward ofyour ankles while standing on a slant board.

Alexander Technique. Speaking of letting the musculature go, I find so many people micro grip in their feet as a result of stress, or strain and pain patterns elsewhere in the body. I love Alexander Technique as a way to learn about your own micro grips and how to find a way to let them go. I recommend working with a teacher, rather than doing this alone at home, as you will need trained eyes to point out things you have become totally blind to in your own body. Most people are amazed at how much they are subconsciously clawing at the floor with their toes. No really.

* Footnote: If you haven't read Born to Run I highly recommend it. And if you are a runner, I practicaly require it (if I could do such a thing). It has a lot of  fascinating information, particulary when it comes to the evolution of highly engineered running sneakers paralleling the evolution of highly unpleasant runner injuries, and is also a beautifully written and engaging story.

Are You at War With Your Fascia?

3965901338_8b663c765f_b“Stand up straight!”, “Don’t slouch!” Blah, blah, we all had childhoods, and particularly teen years, filled with phrases like these. Sadly, most of us learned how to “have better posture” from vague admonishments like these from our parents. But here’s the thing, if all it took was for us know that we should to stand up straight* or to stop slouching, well then we would all have flawless and effortless posture. Clearly something is off, because judging from what I hear all the time from readers and clients in my private practice (not to mention friends, family, etc) we all universally think our posture sucks and want it to be better. We pull ourselves up, but something pulls us back down again into our familiar slouch. To a certain degree that something is gravity, but more precisely it’s how gravity is interacting with our fascia, aka our connective tissue. If we are aligned well fascially, i.e. we have happy soft tissue and joints, then we are what we call “on our line” in gravity. Which is to say we are supported in gravity rather than dragged down by it because the organ of support and structure in us, our fascia, is doing its fabulous springy upright suspension bridge thing and keeping us aligned and upright.

But for most of us we have a myriad of compensatory patterns in the fascia that get us “off our line” and therefore we feel pulled down in gravity. Let’s visualize the fascia a bit first to get a better handle on this; Imagine that you have a tightly knit sweater lying just under your skin. This is your superficial fascia. From there,  this sweater under the skin dives deep to wrap each and every muscle (and organ), spinning continuously into tendon which attaches muscle to bone, and ligament which attaches bone to bone.  From there, this tight knit sweater dives yet deeper, forming the interior architecture of each muscle in your body. To visualize this interior architecture fascia, I often tell people to take a bite out of an orange slice and then look at it. What you’ll see are tiny pods of juice that are contained by these thin, translucent fibrous walls. Without those walls, it would just be juice with no structure. Our muscles are similar. Without fascia, we’re just juice (we’re somewhere around 78% water, remember?).

Now attach this tight knit sweater in your mind to the nervous system. As in, it’s not an inert sweater, it’s a living sweater. And the nervous system tells it when, where, and how much to knit more based on the sensory input it is receiving from you. So for example if you work at a lab hunching over a microscope, your nervous system detects your constant forward hunch position and says, “Ah! I get it. You want to maintain this hunched, bring the shoulders around the ears and strain the neck forward position more easily. I’m on it! I’ll help you out by knitting the fascia up nice and tidily to hold you there. Aren’t I super helpful!?” The same goes for anything you are, or very importantly aren’t, doing with your body on a regular basis*.  Which, of course, means that when you leave your job at the lab, or more likely leave your desk or couch at home and go to straighten up, you meet with some pretty fierce resistance. This is being at war with your fascia.

Because he’s A) a gifted genius and B) he explains this more elegantly than I do, I give you the famous fuzz speech from Gil Hedley of Integral Anatomy (be aware that if you watch this video you will see some cadavers):

So what’s a knit-up-in-all-the-wrong-places person to do? First, we are you, you are us, we are all dealing with fascial restrictions to one degree or another. So take a breather, this is not dire (yet). Before it turns into unpleasant pain conditions or surgeries however, you have two options which, naturally, work best when combined.

  • First, move regularly in multi-dimensional ways. You’re best off moving in ways our ancestors regularly did , which makes MovNat  and things related to it a good option. But you can also just work on your squat, carry stuff, balance, walk, reach for stuff, and lift yourself up and over things (go climb a tree while you’re at it!). Or just go have some fun. It's also no secret that I love Yoga Tune Up® and Restorative Exercise™ for smart movement. 
  • Second, you can check out some of the manual therapies that free up the fascia. Rolfing® and other forms of Structural Integration are great because they deal with the whole which tends to have more thorough and longer term results (I’m biased), and there’s also myofascial release and ART.

Imagine feeling supported by your body from the inside out, pretty appealing right? I encourage you to check out some of the resources I just mentioned above. It's never too late to wave the white flag and make friends with your fascia.

*Footnote: "Stand up straight" is an unfortunate and vague sentence that typically elicits a movement wherein people flatten out their spines, tug their head up, and shove their shoulders back while flaring their ribs forward. Sadly, this is ripe for creating a host of new compensatory patterns and the chronic pain conditions that come with them, so please avoid making this shape, and just try to forget that anyone ever told you that this weird military meets ballerina posture was good for you. It's not. 

Photo by Marmite Toast

DIY Friday: Move

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*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

5837875221_78fdb12266_bAn alternate title for this post was DIY Friday: Everything. Yep, we're going big picture this week and looking at our most important issue, by which I mean this one of the most crucial DIY Fridays ever, as it is the place from which most problems stem; movement. Or our lack of it. I know what you're thinking: "She's not talking about me. I work out 5 days a week." Actually, I am talking exactly to you! So here's the deal, we live in a culture where we believe that exercise and movement are synonymous. Nope. Totally not the case, particularly if your main form of exercise involves gym machines, which are, as far as I'm concerned, a plague upon our people. Don't you love how I over-dramatize things with blanket statements like that?! Me too.

Anyway, since my Rolfing® practice is filled with people who are dealing with fascial and musculoskeletal issues like chronic pain or injuries, I am frequently telling people how and why to avoid gym machines. So I figured we should just go ahead and dive into that topic here. In particular, I have no love for the elliptical machine which has been marketed as the "safe" choice, and yet creates (in my opinion) the most problems for people, particularly those with low back pain. So I wrote this article a while back when this blog hadn't yet been born and my writing of stuff was happening on my private practice website:

Low Back Pain Beware: The Machine to Avoid at the Gym.

And then Katy Bowman wrote these two stellar posts recently which really get at the heart of the matter in a way that makes my girl crush on her only blossom more. Read them, they are wise, wise, wise posts for discerning the difference between "exercise" and "movement" and understanding just what's so lousy about gym machines, and what we miss when we consider exercise the same thing as movement:

First up, Junk Food Walking, and next up:

A Wee Problem with Crossfit. (Which actually starts out addressing the peeing while exercising issue that many women have, but heads away from a pelvic floor conversation to address the root cause, which is what happens when we 1) live in a movement drought and then 2) load our atrophied bodies with "fitness" or "exercise". )

Lastly, I am also falling more and more in love with MovNat® these days, which is a great system that is taking real deal, do-what-your-ancestors-did-movement and making it accessible. If you want to experience some smart movement, find some MovNat near you. Or check out this DVD set (or you can get the downloadable version) where MovNat (Erwan Le Corre) and Functional Movement Systems™ (Gray Cook) join forces. I don't own it yet, but boy howdy, I'm am excited enough to get my hands on it, and have enough faith in both of these guys work, that I'm pre-plugging it here.

That's it! That's all for this week's DIY! I know it's a broader lens than we generally look through on Fridays here at The FFF, but it is profound stuff, and so read the articles, ponder what your ancestors were doing with their bodies back in the day, and know that moving, truly moving, can resolve and prevent a whole lotta problems for a whole lotta people.

Photo by Tigre Sauvage

5 Keys to Age-Proofing (and Reverse Aging) Your Body

5525366853_71d9cf2ba5_bSure we're all going to get crow's feet and, to one degree or another, age. That aging happens is inevitable, but what that means is the interesting conversation. I think in our culture we have been fed the idea that aging means an inevitable downward spiral of ever more medications and surgery (ahem, hip and knee replacements shouldn't be a norm) which ends in a frail, unattractive, pain filled body shuffling towards death. I heartily disagree. Yes, I'm thirty-eight and so many of you out there may be arguing that I'm not allowed to talk about this until I have a few more decades under my belt. To address that, first off, I had a birth injury which meant I grew up with pain and mobility issues until my body gave out on me at the ripe old age of 21. Since that time I have been rehabilitating my own body, which is now light years younger and more capable than it was in my childhood. So I've been reverse aging a body that felt like a ninety-year-old's since I was in my early twenties.

"Yes but you weren't actually ninety!" Ok, ok, secondly I can tell you this: I work in a field where I get a chance to see a lot of bodies, and those bodies in general are the ones who are self-selecting to take care of their physical self. I don't mean in the ripped biceps, botox injecting  model, I mean in the receive bodywork, eat real food, move with integrity model. And what I can tell you is that these people, some of which I've had the chance to watch into their eighties, have a very different experience of aging. And with my colleagues in the field I've just had to accept that I'm always going to assume they are  ten to twenty years younger than they are. Curious? Here's your how-to guide to have the same aging experience that they are:

1) Fascia: There is a fountain of youth, and it lives in your fascia. Your fascia, or connective tissue, is found everywhere in your body. It is your organ of support, and it is also a fluid system which every cell in your body relies on for proper functioning. In fact, connective tissue is mostly fluid, and I often refer to the process of differentiating your fascia (as through some of the methods I will list below) as a process of becoming better irrigated. We have all this information (most of your sensory nerves live in the fascia), and all this nutrition and waste that needs to move through, so you've got to keep yourself well irrigated in order to stay supple and healthy. Sue Hitzmann puts it perfectly in her book The MELT Method"Think of a sponge; when it's dry, it's stiff, but when it's moist, it's flexible, adaptable, and resilient. You can twist, squeeze, or compress a moist sponge, and it returns to its original shape. Your body's connective tissue is similar: when it's hydrated it's buoyant and adaptable. But when it's dehydrated, it gets stiff and inflexible."  It is this hydrated and supple quality to the fascia that I believe yields the most miraculous anti-aging and reverse aging benefits.

Want to get that fascia all supple and re-hydrated so you can look younger, move younger, and be pain free? Some great methods (and there are many so forgive me for not having them all here!), are Rolfing®, or other forms of Structural Integration (Kinesis Myofascial Integration®) , The MELT Method®, Tune Up Fitness/Yoga Tune Up®, Active Release Techniques®, and Strain Counterstrain.

2) Feet:  Ready? Set!? Picture an old person’s feet! Did an image of a gnarled up, bunioned out, tendon popping hammer toe mess spring to mind? Not a pretty picture, right? (Sorry to do that to you by the way.) We all have this image in mind because, sadly, a person’s age often shows very clearly in their feet. Most importantly, those aged feet show in a stiffened and rigid movement pattern in the whole body upstream from those feet. Indeed, if you want to pick one joint complex to be attentive to between now and your ninetieth birthday to dramatically alter your own aging process, that joint complex should be the toe hinge. As an example of how the toe hinge works, when you take a step, there should be a point in your gait pattern where your heel is lifted off the floor, and your toes are still in contact with the floor. This movement, which is also what allows everything upstream from there to move (particularly your spine), is courtesy of your toe hinge. Yep, foot mobility is the key to mobility everywhere else.

Generally speaking your feet are also the key to a healthy and independent life as you age. If you can’t move your feet, mobility shuts down everywhere and you become rigid, in pain, and have an unstable gait and poor balance and coordination. This all puts you at greater risks for falls and their resulting long recovery periods which bring yet more atrophy to your whole body, which is harder to recover from in older age.  So if you want to be springy and young now, mobile feet are the key to your springy-ness.  And by keeping that up through the years, you will also be preparing for an independent and mobile life in your eighties and beyond.

You can make better friends with your feet by regularly walking in nature on uneven surfaces, wearing neutral heeled shoes, reading this great resource, or rolling them out as I do in video #2 here.

3) Food: I’ll fess up that I am not a nutritionist or any other kind of –ist or –ician that has any business giving people advice on food. In fact, as a manual therapist I almost never open my mouth about food to people in my practice. However, I can unequivocally tell you that when we’re talking about age-proofing your body, you are, indeed, what you eat. Having put my hands on lord knows how many bodies over my years in practice I can tell you that the people eating a lot of processed food and sugar have tissue that feels more like a tree trunk than like human flesh. I’ve even encountered some people whose tissue quality was closer to marble. Ouch! I’m not going to tell you that you need to adopt some specific dietary regimen because, as I said, that’s not my expertise. So this is not my big moment to tell you to go Paleo or go vegan or go whatever. But what I can say is if you want healthy tissue, glowing skin, and the juicy hydrated fascia that leads to all that, you should eat food that is food. So if you go the vegan route, um, soy bacon is not food. And if you go the Paleo route, a paleo “nutrition” bar is not food. Eat clean, eat food, live long, prosper.

4)Move Well: Everything we do with our bodies is input. If you sit slumped all day, your nervous system gets the idea that that's what you want and supports it, thereby gradually shutting down other movement options. We have so much gorgeous intricate movement available to us, and we’re generally using such a small percentage of it in our day to day lives. Yes, move it or lose it really does apply. And if you lose savvy and diversified movement patterning, like your body’s version of putting the blinders on, you lose what goes unexplored and develop ever more body blind spots. The old folks shuffle that everyone can imitate is the physical embodiment of living with many unused avenues of movement potential.

Generally in the fitness world, loads of emphasis is put on moving your body more and being more physically fit. What we don’t hear about all that much is the importance of moving well. One of my favorite quotes from Gray Cook is, “First move well, then move often.” [italics mine] More commonly in our culture people will first sit on the couch or in front of the computer for many years thinking about how they should be more physically fit while atrophying all healthy functional movement patterning. Then they will decide enough is enough and get off the couch and work their asses off at the gym, or training for a marathon or what have you to “get fit”. And lastly they will injure themselves through overuse or poor mechanics or a combo platter of the two, and will have to either stop being active or back way up and learn how to move well as they recover and slowly get back into activity.

But there is a better way! Before you throw yourself whole hog into some new fitness frenzy please, please, please dedicate some time to learning smart movement as you ramp it up. I believe that much of the plague of chronic pain that we see nowadays comes primarily from a culture that reinforces poor movement patterning with all of our sitting, and sitting, and well, also there is the sitting. Oh and the inactivity that comes as a package deal with the sitting. Did I mention sitting? This is my way of saying that you are not immune to this one even if you have a six pack and think you are way past learning how to move intelligently. If you live in our current culture and haven’t abandoned modern society to go create a new hunter gatherer tribe, then you are affected. Even with a career in this field and with spending the last 17 years rehabilitating my own body, I am still constantly uncovering and eradicating my own body blind spots.

To ferret out your own body blind spots, become a smart sassy mover, and injury-proof your body while reverse aging it, some excellent systems to check out are Tune Up Fitness/Yoga Tune Up, Restorative Exercise™, Functional Movement Systems®, and MovNat®.

5) Move Often: Now that you are moving well (P.S. that’s a lifelong endeavor, so keep it up) now you can move often! Hooray! Do I really need to do the thing where I repeat what we all know about how important physical activity is? That as humans we are born to move and when we don’t we break down in a myriad of ways? I didn't think so. You guys are totally on that, so what I will say is that you should move as often as feels good, while still remembering that recovery is a super important part of the training process. If you start to feel tired and cranky all the time and you notice you are recovering from your workouts more slowly or are getting injured or dealing with pre-injury nagging aches and pains, remember to take some recovery time. Beyond being attentive to not over training  all you have to do is to find movement that you can fall in love with and embrace it! I don’t know that anyone ever fell in love with walking on the treadmill at the gym while watching The View, so I give you full permission and encouragement to chuck that, but when you begin to explore the endless choices for moving your body, you’re bound to find several things that will resonate with you and put you in your happy place. Hiking! Stand Up Paddleboarding! Capoeira! Yoga! Rock climbing! Powerlifting! Kayaking! Break dancing! Parkour! See, lots of options. Go explore the wide world of movement, find what you love, stop dreading your “workout” and instead fall in love with moving your body.

Photo by ShelterIt

DIY Friday: Piriformis Syndome, The Literal Pain in the Ass

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*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

498391534_e8873818ac_zSometimes when it rains it pours, and right now it is raining pains in the ass in my life. Fortunately not of the icky people variety, but rather in the actual ass department. For whatever reason not only am I seeing a lot of clients in my Rolfing® practice with piriformis syndrome at the moment, but one of my closest friends is also currently in agony from the same thing. So for all of you who are dealing with this rather unpleasant pain syndrome, this DIY Friday is dedicated to you.

Before we dive into the resource round up for the week, just a little bit about piriformis syndrome. Your piriformis is a small muscle in the back of your pelvis which connects to your sacrum and hip and is deep to your glutes. This muscle and the sciatic nerve have a special relationship: depending on your anatomy it either passes right next to the piriformis and they are close neighbors, or some people have a split piriformis muscle and the sciatic nerve passes right through it. It causes pain, you guessed it, in your ass, and because of the nerve agitation can also travel down your leg and into your foot. The pain can be severe and is frequently caused by the thing we do most commonly in our culture: sitting (especially sitting on your coccyx/tailbone with a rounded low back!). Now on to the good stuff:

  1. First, check out what the divine Katy Bowman, founder of The Restorative Exercise™ Institute has to say about stretching the piriformis, and also preventing and resolving piriformis syndrome through sitting appropriately. Sitting on your tuberosities instead of your coccyx is one of my big important causes that people have to listen to me yammer on about all the time. So now you can listen Katy for a change. Here's her post where she declares Stretch Your Piriformis Day a holiday. I'm all for it! This also includes one of my favorite alignment nerd videos of all time.
  2. Next, Brett Blankner of Zen and the Art of Triathalon has a very handy video that covers how to do nerve flossing to relieve the pain on your own. That sounds like fun, right? But it's thoroughly useful. We'll forgive Brett for sitting on his tuberosities in the video since it's just so dang helpful. Also I choose to believe that it's because he filmed it in a cramped hotel room. You sit on your tuberosities, right Brett!? I digress, you can watch that video here.
  3. Next up, Dawn Adams tackles it on the Yoga Tune Up® blog. This talks about how you can use the therapy balls to work it, and includes a video of another great stretch. Here's all that goodness.
  4. And, oops, since the magical Alpha Ball is new, there isn't any video of how to use that (which Dawn mentions in her post and which I am a huge fan of), so I made up up right quick for you which you can watch right here:
  5. Lastly, hey now, there's a book! And it's written by all around great body nerd Jonathan Fitzgordon who created the Core Walking Method! Right on! Sciatica/Piriformis Syndrome to the rescue.

Photo by Erik Mallinson