therapy balls

Love for the Upper Trapezius

trapeziusI am lucky enough to know (and to live near enough to video!) an exceptional teacher, Lillee Chandra. Lillee has devised an ingenious solution for getting at that "spot" that you are always trying to squish at the end of the day. Enter Lillee:

In our tech-ready, chair-heavy modern world, the neck and upper back are a tension dumping ground for the majority of people. However, one of the most common areas of complaint lives directly under the swagging outline of the upper trapezius. Here, a convergence of many deep shoulder-to-head and neck-to-trunk musculature traverse, namely the: levator scapula, middle and posterior scalenes, and the supraspinatus.

Treating this pervasive trigger point epicenter on one’s own is compounded by the fact that to apply the most effective vertical pressure to it, one must push top-down into the shoulder. Even most thumbs (both trained and untrained), tire quickly when scrubbing along this supraspinous gutter that runs from neck’s bottom to the head of the humerus. These approaches are generally awkward for the giver but even more importantly, the source of pain tends to continually escape into hiding along the many folds of various muscular fiber directions exposed here.

Here is a way to finally treat yourself without having to exhaust yourself. This Yoga Tune Up® Therapy Ball solution allows you to get the most beneficial angle of approach while laying down in a relaxed position and using your feet to push instead of your thumbs.

                                                                                                                          

About the Author

Lillee headshotLillee Chandra, the founder of Chandra Bodyworks ,has a distinct approach to massage therapy and yoga that is fueled by more than 20 years of experience in competitive sports, movement arts, health education, and therapeutic bodywork. Her diverse clinical training, keen intuition, and exceptional hands-on skills have distinguished her as a leader among fitness and health communities. She is a known specialist in postural re-education, pain management, and injury and illness rehabilitation. Thai Yoga Massage, Craniosacral work, and Yoga Tune Up® strongly inform her hands-on therapies.

Her unique style of working with the body is significantly sculpted and nurtured from advanced trainings with Ana Forrest and Glenn Black, and now more recently, from her mentorship with Jill Miller.

In addition to her full-time private massage therapy practice in CT, Lillee continually extends her professional reach to students and teachers throughout the US by developing and leading anatomy and yoga teacher trainings, workshops and classes.

Lillee has taught at Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health, is a member of the International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT), and is a certified Yoga Tune Up® (YTU) Integrated Teacher. She is a top assistant to Jill Miller, a contributing author and editor for YTU articles and training curriculum and leads YTU Anatomy modules and YTU Teacher trainings nationally. She is currently concluding her Clinical Orthopedic Massage Certificate with Dr. Joseph Muscolino.

trapezius image by Anatomy for Sculptors

 

Self-Care Shopping Guide

4226651008_514325a786_zFirst, I missed you guys! I've spent a month on a social media fast, and have managed to accomplish a lot while learning a few things about the inner workings of my Facebook addiction... but I'll save that for another time. The fruits of my time off are in the hands of my brilliant designer and developer, so get ready for some new goodness. First up will be my (free!) ebook Why Fascia Matters. Rest assured I'll let you all know when it's available.

In the meantime, I'm back with what is clearly a deep and important topic: shopping. Ok forgive me but 'tis the season. And why not celebrate the holidays by spreading around more self-care? Self-care is healthcare! Here are my top picks for the gifts that give back this year*:

  • Yoga Tune Up® Massage Therapy Full Body Kit: I obsess about them all the time here on FFF, so you may be familiar with the Yoga Tune Up® therapy balls. Did you know they have a full body self-massage kit with DVD's for working the whole body which comes with a set of therapy balls in a tote? They do, and it's fab. 
  • MELT Method Roller and book: Want another method of working your own glorious tissue? Grab a MELT roller and the MELT Method book which takes you step-by-step through how to work on your own body at home. (please note that a MELT Method roller is profoundly different from a foam roller, so a foam roller cannot be substituted).
  • Coregous DVD and Coregeous ball: I get it that Jill Miller looks a little bit like a Kardashian on the cover of this DVD, and so that might deceive you that this is a fluff product about looking cuter in a bikini. But don't be fooled! I give this to my clients all the time (including plenty of men) as the wisest core work that I have found. Which, in a world where the word "core" is vastly overused and abused, is pretty great. This is particularly useful for people with back pain, hip flexor pain, or groin pulls. And the Coregeous ball itself is a miracle worker of brilliant self care work for the abdomen and spine.
  • Happy Feet Socks: For the people you love who are dealing with foot pain, bunions, hammer toes, and/or plantar fasciitis these things are gold. So yummy at the end of the day!
  • Katy Bowman's books: Biomechanist extraordinaire, Katy Bowman, has two fantastic books that will help anyone to learn how to be happier in their own bodies. In keeping with the theme of foot pain, first there is Every Woman's Guide to Foot Pain Relief (which by the way is a great book for men too, they can just skip the bits about stilettos...). The second is Alignment Matters, a complete book of the first 5 years of Katy's blog. Not only are there many jaw dropping insights to be had by reading the book, but it is also wildy funny and entertaining to read.
  • Core Walking Method: I'm a big believer that we can heal much of what ails us by resolving some of the wacky ways we walk. The reason why I don't write a lot about "how to walk" on the blog is that walking is a complex full body movement, and one that we have many blind spots on. I have found that when people hear information about how to walk "properly" that they often wind up rehabilitating themselves into a new problem. That's where Jonathan Fitzgordon's program comes in handy. This gives you videos and a whole lotta information about how to safely and gradually make positive changes in your gait pattern.
  • 8 Steps to a Pain Free Back: This is Esther Gokhale's definitive book which takes an anthropological view as to why we have so much pain in our culture (which you may have noticed is my favorite conversation to have), and also gives very straightforward movement advice that can make enormous differences in how you feel. She is especially helpful for those who have a job that keeps them in a chair. Speaking of which:
  • The Stretchsit cushion: Is also from Esther Gokhale and can be a very helpful aid to happier, healthier sitting. We're stuck doing at least a certain amount of it (for example, in the car), so why not make it as therapeutic as possible?

Happy self-care shopping!

*Needless to say, I have not mentioned any of these because I get a kick back of any sort. None of these are affiliate links. I just like this stuff!

photo by SBC9

 

 

DIY Friday: Make Your Jaw Happy

diyfriday (2)

*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

5504152401_e1df6a4387_bI do the work that I do because of TMJD, otherwise known as Temporal Mandibular Joint Disorder. You may know it better as jaw clicking, popping, locking, and pain. I had a birth injury which injured my upper cervicals (neck), and so I grew up with an out of whack jaw which, by the time I was in my early 20’s, was barely functional. I could occasionally open my mouth all the way (it sounded like a rifle going off and would attract confused stares), and for a period of a few months in a row I actually wasn’t able to open it more than a quarter of an inch; Just enough to squeeze a straw through my teeth to get some liquid nourishment in. I actually had a physical therapist tell me I would be on soft foods or even a liquid diet for the rest of my life. I was twenty-two.

This lovely condition meant that I also had severe chronic pain in my head, neck, spine, and sacroiliac joints. I was a mess. I was also very lucky to find a TMJD (sometimes also called TMD) specialist who didn’t believe in the surgery, and after building some splints to re-align my jaw is the person who ordered me to get some good bodywork (I had no idea what that meant at the time, but after researching I found my way to Rolfing®) and to learn how to meditate. To keep this DIY Friday from spiraling into a memoir, I’ll end the story there but suffice it to say, I got better, I discovered a career I love, and if you are suffering with this condition I feel your pain. For reals.

That said, I have wanted to write this DIY Friday for ages but since I am oh so passionate about TMJD I tend to go on and on and on. I’m going to try and keep it short and will save the meaty version for a book series I am kicking off this year on resolving common chronic pain and mobility issues (stay tuned!).

Ok, I’m reigning myself in, TMJD, as I mentioned, is a disorder of the jaw. It is ridiculously common, and varies from mild to severe. My case is an example of the severe range. Other people may just have occasional clicking or locking and headaches or neck pain. It also often manifests with sacroiliac pain (the dimples at your low back where it meets your pelvis), as the jaw and SI joints commonly mirror one another.

Things get out of whack in a jaw for a myriad of reasons, but injury, poorly done orthodontia or other dental work, and stress are top of the heap. Regardless of the cause, what happens is that your bite winds up not meeting properly, and the cartilaginous disc that is between your mandible (jaw bone) and your temporal bone gets out of place (the clicking you hear is when it slips back into place, when the disc does not go back into place, or if it gets folded over on itself, the jaw will lock). This also loads your musculature and fascia improperly and you wind up with pain and a gnarly full body compensatory pattern.

Because the root issue is a poorly aligned bite, in the past people in the medical world have gone bonkers and jumped right in to whittle down people’s teeth, surgically alter their TMJ in horrific ways, or even break and reset the jaw. Do not go this route! Your jaw is misaligned because your soft tissue- fascia, muscles, tendons, and ligaments- are out of alignment. This can be resolved. So before you go altering what your maker gave you, get some smart soft tissue work. You may have a severe case in which case extremely well informed orthodontia may be needed to move your teeth into the position of your new bite (I had to do this), but cases that require this are in the minority. And the surgeries for TMJD have all had very poor outcomes, and often leave people with more pain than they started with and a lifetime of repair surgeries. In short, keep it mellow and be suspicious of highly invasive tactics. Less is more when it comes to realigning the jaw.

To get your jaw aligned without invasive and unsuccessful interventions, I highly recommend you seek out one or a few of the following:

A Rolfing practitioner or other Structural Integrator: Rolfers like me graduated from the school Dr. Rolf founded, The Rolf Institute, other SI people go to different schools like The Guild or KMI. • A craniosacral therapist: People who practice craniosacral have widely varying degrees of education. Make sure your practitioner is well trained and hasn’t just dipped their toes into this form of manual therapy with a few hours or a weekend of training. • A cranial osteopath: This is brilliant and highly sophisticated work. • An acupuncturist: Not someone who has studied “dry needling” in one weekend to tack it on to their medical or PT practice. A real deal acupuncturist. If they have also studied Chinese herbs that’s a good sign of a highly educated Chinese medicine doctor.

But wait! This is DIY Friday!? Well good news, I adore this video of my teacher, Jill Miller, with Kelly Starrett of Mobility WOD working with TMJD. This sequence is profound and I would have given my right arm to have had it 16 years ago. So use it well.

A few caveats: Jill’s tissue is like silk from all the smart input she gives it, so if you are flared up with a jaw disorder, or simply if this is your first work with the therapy balls, do what she is doing but in slow motion. The therapy balls can be found here, and if you’re looking for one to buy instead of all of them the alpha (the single large therapy ball) will be your best option in this sensitive tissue as it is a broader stroke. Do not use lacrosse balls, golf balls, baseballs, or any other ridiculous hard balls in this area. This is a sensitive place!

Without further ado, I give you Jill and Kelly:

photo by Theen

Jill Miller Interview

interviews-small

JM_Headshot_Seated_Crop1_largerI am thoroughly delighted and honored to introduce you all to one of my teachers, Jill Miller. Jill is the creator of Yoga Tune Up® and the co-founder (with her husband) of Tune Up Fitness Worldwide®. In our interview we talk about the origins of her work, her brilliant case study for The Fascia Research Congress, why she retires yoga poses, and much more.

I owe an enormous debt of gratitude to all the good that her work has brought to my body and my life, and so naturally I highly recommend that you check it out for yourself. That said, no one talks about it better than Jill, so you can check out her interview below (with the transcript for skimming below that). And if you're curious what my favorite Yoga Tune Up goodies are, I covered that in last week's DIY Friday Ode to Yoga Tune Up. 

 

1:14 In her own words Jill describes Yoga Tune Up. It works to address the 3 P’s: pain, posture, and performance. No matter what your “thing” is it helps you to live better in your body.

2:12 A combination of conscious corrective exercise and self care tools (the therapy balls) help people to find and heal their body blind spots, which are the catalysts for injuries.

4:38 You have to disassemble your movement to see where you’re broken. It’s amazing to find out where you’ve gone blind, deaf, or dumb to yourself. It’s a wonderful journey. I [Jill] work with a lot of people who are in deep pain conditions.

5:45 Thank God for Western medicine, I [Jill] don’t hate doctors, but movement medicine is very potent and it works. More often than not people get the runaround and are not given the opportunity to first fix how they’re moving before they are putting bandaids on it with medications or with surgery.

6:10 Jill tells the story of her mother who spent 5 months being given the runaround. When she had nerve pain down her arm, she was first put on a cancer medication for a skin condition, and it took that long (5 months) for them to give her an MRI to find stenosis in her neck. In her first session of physical therapy she felt better

8:18 We can interrupt the movement patterns that lead to that kind of pain by making a better choice now in how we’re moving.

8:54 Jill tells the story of how and why she began practicing yoga at age 11 to cope with a very stressful childhood

9:58 How the Jane Fonda workout and the Raquel Welch yoga video were her way in to falling in love with movement, since she began as a very sedentary kid who was really out of touch with her body.

10:46 Fast forward to college where Jill was studying dance and movement and studying shiatsu on the side. She found her way to the Omega Institute and her teacher and mentor, Glenn Black at age 19.

11:31 Glenn Black specializes in human movement and does a hands on therapeutic modality called Body Tuning, which is a physical therapy approach created by Shmuel Tatz who is based in NYC.

12:08 Her early yoga training with Glenn Black involved a lot of hands on bodywork from him, to manipulate the tissues manually so that people’s movement could change.

13:00 Seeing how soft tissue work was intertwined with your physical practice from this early age influenced her development of Yoga Tune Up therapy balls and their various derivatives

14:11 Equinox fitness clubs is now rolling out her therapy ball program (heh heh pun intended) which she has created for them

14:40 I mention that I don’t know if I would be able to continue practicing at the volume that I do as a Rolfing practitioner without YTU and the therapy balls in my life.

16:03 There are techniques that change you neurologically. There are techniques that decohere soft tissues. This doesn’t have to be the domain just behind a clinicians door. These are things anyone can do for themselves to help themselves heal.

16:53 You are not off limits to yourself. It’s not their [the clinicians] right to touch you exclusively. This is true empowerment

17:44 Jill was the only yoga teacher ever to present at the http://www.fasciacongress.org/ Fascia Research Congress, which she did in 2012.

18:17 Jill tells the story of her amazing case study for the Fascia Research Congress. It detailed her work with a client who has Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which is a nerve wasting disease in which one loses function in the hands, forearms, lower legs, feet, etc. Many people with this disease have multiple surgeries.

19:12 When he began working with Jill he came to her in deep emotional duress, and was on the highest doses of narcotic painkillers, sleep medication, anti-anxiety medication, and urinary control medication, and was in absolute agony at age 40. Over the course of the next 4 years he decided to stop wearing his leg braces. He can now lace up his own shoes. He was told he would never be able to use his opposable thumb, but he can pick up pennies now, he can button up his shirt. And perhaps most astonishingly, he is off the narcotic painkillers.

22:08 This gentleman, the subject of her case study, now knows that he can help himself instead of having to take more medication. He knows how to quell his nervous system and to help his physical state so that he is no longer dependant on medication.

22:53 Movement medicine is free socialized medicine. It’s so easy to make change in your body! Jill gives her universal cues for everyone, in 4 seconds, no equipment required, to have a “quick fix” for themselves.

23:36 If my [Jill’s] clients, who are “crippled” for lack of a better word can get better, than Joe Schmoe and Jane Schmoe can do it. It’s never too late to regenerate your body, it’s built for change. You just have to give it some discipline and apply our best conscious will.

25:15 Jill discusses her practice of retiring yoga poses

25:42 I [Jill] used to think I was hypermobile. I was always the demo girl in classes showing how people could get their foot all the way up to their forehead. I am a fanatic and I am obsessive, and that is a deadly combo when you focus on improving joint range of motion, because I had blown past my sense mechanism, and that’s one of the reasons why I focus so much on proprioception. Because I had blown myself so wide open to the degree that I couldn’t sense myself. I couldn’t straighten my knees, I couldn’t get out of bed without extreme amounts of pain, and I had done it to myself. I didn’t realize the practice was hurting me.

27:51 There are many yoga poses I [Jill] simply don’t do anymore because I feel that they are full of jeopardy for the body. I also want to be an example to my students. There are a lot of poses that are creating massive structural damage, and I think that there is a cover up going on, because there are many teachers of a certain age, over age 50 or 60 or so, who are having many surgeries, hip replacements, spinal surgeries, and neck surgeries.

28:29 The myth is that if you are watching yourself breathe, you can’t possibly get hurt. Which is not true. Your ability to breathe in and out is not the only measurement of if you are doing damage to yourself. It’s a great concentration tool, but we need to help our students understand how they’re holding themselves all the time, to be able to better assess what is healthy for them.

29:13 Many poses blow past the safety zone without people realizing it. And whether you can take deep ujjayi breaths there is not going to tell you if that pose is precipitating thinning of the tissue in your joints which  5 years or 10 years down the road is going to cause trouble.

30:06 Doing these extreme poses doesn’t give me pleasure anymore. What gives me pleasure is to have my head over my rib cage and my rib cage over my pelvis and to be able to respect my body and how I respond. Give that a chance, to be as impeccable as possible, and see how that follows you into the rest of your movement.

 

DIY Friday: Ode to Yoga Tune Up

diyfriday (2)

*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

logo YTUNext week my interview with Jill Miller, creator of Yoga Tune Up® and co-founder of Tune Up Fitness Worldwide® will be up on the site. Since I happen to be one of her students- and am therefore a teacher of Yoga Tune Up-  I am clearly a big advocate for her brilliant self care work. That said, I thought I'd dedicate this DIY Friday to reviewing my personal favorite* Yoga Tune Up products that help you to heal yourself and to live better in your body. Yoga Tune Up is a treasure trove for magnifying your ability to repair and restore your body, so what better topic when we're talking do-it-yourself!?

First off, no conversation about Yoga Tune Up (YTU) would be complete without talking balls. So let's start there, shall we? You've seen several of my posts here that utilize the YTU therapy balls (like this one on the upper back and shoulders, and this one on lengthening the hamstrings), and that's because they can be pretty magical. I personally favor the original therapy balls, and the alpha ball, and Jill has recently come out with a 2 disc DVD set, the Massage Therapy Full Body Kit that will take you through working out all the issues in your tissues. For a long time only audio CD's of this work were available, so this is pretty exciting. Trust me, it's like hiring a live-in massage therapist, but without the billionaire salary. It's powerful stuff.

As for the DVD's, my absolute favorite is Coregeous. "Core" must be one of the most overused and misunderstood terms in the fitness world right now. Most often it translates to "look hot in a bikini". Sigh. These programs are often not only boring but are also poorly informed movement that can lead to more trouble than the promise of a hot bikini bod is worth. Coregeous is multiple bite sized programs for deeply and intricately working on restoring your core (which means all the layers of your abdomen and also your spine). My secret admission here (sorry Jill) is that I call the cover image of the DVD "Jill Kardashian" due to her bare midriff and tousled hair... in a nutshell the cover of the DVD looks exactly like "look hot" marketing. But the contents are so exquisitely useful for everything from back pain, sacral issues, sciatica, groin pain, posture, and more that I send clients home with it frequently telling them to ignore the Jill Kardashian image and just watch it to see how brilliant it is. In fact I very commonly give this to my male athlete clients as so many of them hold a ton of tension in their hip flexors and/or suffer from low back pain. They have all fallen in love with the DVD and proclaim that it's saved their bodies and made a dramatic impact on their training. You will feel the same. Oh and the Coregeous ball that goes with it is a must.

Lastly, you can scope out all the free resources that live at the Yoga Tune Up You Tube channel. Or find a teacher in your area!

*Footnote: Yep, as stated these just happen to be my personal favorite things, which means that I have found them applicable to my own body. So if you happen to have knee stuff, for example, you'll probably adore the Knee Hab DVD, but I just happen to not have used it since I have happy knees, and so did not review it here. To see what other YTU goodies might call to you more precisely, you can scope everything out here

DIY Friday: Upper Back and Shoulders Part 1

diyfriday (2)

*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

4927974025_116c045142_bI recently asked the Facebook tribe what they wanted me to give them help on in this week's DIY Friday and there was a whole lotta talk of shoulders and the upper back! I can't exactly say I'm surprised. We live in a culture that puts an awful lot of demand here in ways that our bodies are not well designed for. All of that looking at screens, sitting, and typing causes upper back, neck, and shoulder pain that our hunter gatherer ancestors were not having to deal with. I used to joke that the first person who came into my Rolfing® practice with no tension pattern in their upper trapezius would win a treasure chest of prizes. I have not given out any prizes. Call me a defeatist, but I have not even gone shopping for treasure chests. Ok partly that's just the practicality of having a hard time finding stores that carry treasure chests...

But in the hopes that I'll be handing out prizes for supple upper trapezius muscles soon, here's part 1 of a 2 part post on some of the most crucial alignment issues that we face in our shoulders and upper back, as well as some very juicy self massage strategies that are likely to have you shouting, "Hallelujiah!"

Before we bust out the therapy balls, here's a video from me ranting about one of my most despised hall of shame alignment cues. You've all heard it before, "Pull your shoulders back." Argh! To see how this cue may be causing a significant increase in your upper back pain and why I would get so complain-y about something so seemingly innocuous, give it a watch:

And now, finally, the moment you've all been waiting for. Knowing how to work on that cranky tissue on your own. First, to deal with the internal rotation, shoulders creeping up and forward thing that I describe in the video, here's a quickie therapy ball strategy to unglue your pec minor muscle, one of the main culprits in forward rounded shoulders (it's an oldie from before FFF):

Last but very, very much not least, this is the good stuff that you're wanting to get into at the end of every workday. Jill Miller shows you her Yoga Tune Up® therapy ball strategies for getting at the upper trapezius, supraspinatus, and rhomboids. Heavenly! This is a powerful 4 minutes and 55 seconds everyone. It might just change your life (as it does mine at the end of every Rolfing or writing day).

 

*Jill and I are both using the original sized therapy balls in these videos, and they can be found here

photo by Sam MacKenzie

 

DIY Friday: Meet the Knee Whisperer

diyfriday (2)

*Do it yourself! Every Friday we do a roundup of great posts, videos, or other resources around a theme that help people to turn their bodies from cranky to happy.*

2270021696_c2997ac4ae_oWell many of you already met "The Knee Whisperer", aka Christine Jablonski, via hearing her story of healing a gnarly knee injury and how she's managed to keep all her own parts (hooray no knee replacement!), but now you get to learn some of her most coveted Yoga Tune Up® therapy ball movements for rehabilitating her knees. Watch them, use them, go for it, but remember that healing from anything is a whole body process, so this is only a piece of the puzzle. For a full on Yoga Tune Up program to rehabilitate your knees, check out the brilliant and very thorough KneeHab DVD here.

Here in the first video she works her magic on releasing the quads by using the plus sized therapy balls to simultaneously work both ends (both tendons) of the rectus femoris. If this all sounds like Greek to you, no worries, just try it and see how quickly it can make your knees happy:

In the second video Christine hops to the backside of the leg and shows you how to work your calves and hamstring tendons at the same time, all while also providing some flexion gapping, i.e. giving your knee joint the space it needs to "breathe", rather than just doing the rote strengthen and tighten regimen that people are most often given. (As she and I discussed in our chat earlier this week, that's a fine thing, but it's only one piece of the puzzle and you need to make sure that joint also has some space so you don't wear away at it.):

Lastly, let's not forget the adductors! Your inner thighs need some lovin' too.  Christine shows you how to give them that love with the alpha ball:

*All therapy ball sizes can be found here!

Photo by coba

DIY Friday: Lengthen those itty bitty hamstrings!

diyfriday (2)

5483358664_22080e5e98_bI have been a card carrying member of the short hamstrings club my whole life. As a result of a birth injury I had, among other things, profoundly limited range of motion in my posterior chain (think back body/postural musculature). So while every other little girl in ballet class was effortlessly falling into a full split, I was busy trying desperately to touch my toes, which at that time resulted in merely touching my knees. Yep you guessed it, ballet classes didn't last long for me (and ended in tears...). I honestly had recurring dreams as a child about doing an exquisite forward fold and being able to press my nose to my knees.

While I still struggle to some extent with mobility restrictions in my posterior chain (the nose to knees dream has yet to be realized for example) I have come a long, long way from the days of feeling like the gimpy girl in ballet class. I still smile every time my hands touch the floor in a forward fold, and I doubt that will ever go away! So for those of you who are looking at the floor with yearning as your fingertips dangle far above the floor, this DIY Friday is for you.

The first 3 videos are re-posts from my private practice blog, Soma Happy, which was the inspiration for FFF (it became FFF because I wanted it to be more than just my voice). So you can watch my three favorite insta-hamstring lengtheners in action! They are all taken from Yoga Tune Up®, which I teach, and if you want to get the magical therapy balls for yourself, you can find them here. And once you get past all of my videos, there is a link to a super useful post from Gray Cook which offers another perspective.

First up, how to use the therapy balls to safely roll out the hamstrings directly without agitating the sciatic nerve:

Secondly, this one is a sneaky little side door entrance to longer hamstrings! You'll find that by simply rolling out your feet, that your entire posterior chain is lengthened courtesy of the magic of fascia (connective tissue). Test it out for yourself by doing an initial forward fold/toe touch, then rolling out one foot, and doing another toe touch before moving on to the other side. Are your hamstrings much longer on the side that got the foot rolling? Boy howdy they are!

Lastly, this is a stretch called Asymmetrical Forward Fold which will really get you and your toes closer to one another. Try the same test/retest as in the last video by doing before and after forward folds, checking the difference between sides when you have only worked one leg.

Ok that's just about enough of me. All of my approaches here are myo-fascial release oriented. For another perspective from a great mind in functional movement, this is an excellent article from Gray Cook, one of the co-founders of Functional Movement Systems, which addresses the neural factors at play, and the why behind short hamstrings. Hint: many of us are using them as stabilizers, so if you want to lengthen them, you had also better pay close attention to upping the ante on stability and motor control as well. Bonus! It also has phenomenal instruction on deadlifting (with video) if you stick around to the end. Check it out here: What's In a Toe Touch? 

 

Photo by kevinalle